How Do I Configure and Troubleshoot Recorders with an Internal RAID Adapter?
FAQ #118

Warning: under normal operating conditions there is no reason to modify a RAID system on your recorder. Modifying a RAID incorrectly may result in complete data loss. Proceed with caution and call technical support if you feel uncomfortable working with a RAID system.

You can configure and troubleshoot recorders with an internal RAID adapter by following the steps that correspond with your RAID controller:

Configuration:

There are 2 main internal RAID controllers employed by the recorder (this also includes in some cases the hybrid and network recorders). One is onboard on the Intel D945GNTLKR series motherboard (www.intel.com), a second type is an add-in card made by the 3ware company (www.3ware.com). To work with either of these RAID controller cards, it is important to identify which series you have. This can be identified either on boot-up of the system, or in the device manager of Windows in the following ways…

3ware:

  1. On boot-up the 3 Ware card will identify itself with a message: “3ware ATA RAID Controller”, or
  2. In the Windows device manager, look for the following under “SCSI and RAID” controllers



Intel:

  1. On boot-up, the Intel D945GNTLKR will identify itself with a message: “Intel Matrix Storage Manager”, or
  2. In the Windows device manager look for the following under “SCSI and RAID” controllers: 



Once it has been determined which RAID controller is in use, you can begin configuring and trouble shooting the RAID.

Note: There are different RAID types that can be setup with-in a RAID controllers menu: RAID 0 (Stripe), RAID 1 (Mirror), RAID 5, RAID 10 (Mirror + Stripe), and JBOD. A RAID 5 is what is used in the recorder and requires a minimum of three drives to create. A 4-Drive RAID 5 is the more commonly in use on a recorder that comes pre-configured with a RAID system. A RAID 5 is the only type of RAID configuration approved for use with your system.

Troubleshooting:

The purpose behind a RAID 5 is data protection and performance, primarily to protect you from data loss if a hard drive fails. In a RAID 5 setup, the member drives will have parity distributed across them, and one of the drives will not appear to be available for data storage. For example, with four 250GB drives you will have approximately 750GB of storage available, not 1.0 terabyte. Should any one of the member drives fail, the RAID controller will give you a warning message indicating the RAID Array is operating in a degraded mode. If you see this type of message from the RAID controller, take immediate action.

3ware:

  1. If you have a degraded state on your 3ware RAID system, enter the RAID’s BIOS by using the key combination of “ALT + 3” on boot-up of the system when prompted by the message: “Press <Alt-3> to access 3ware BIOS Manager."
  2. You will be greeted by a warning message. Hit any key to proceed after reading the warning message.
  3. Check to see which port number (SATA-0 through SATA-3) is assigned to the effected drive and replace the drive. Note: power down system before replacing drive.
  4. After replacing the drive, enter the RAID BIOS again with “ALT + F3” and select the RAID Unit(s), then select the replacement drive using the arrow keys on your keyboard and hit “enter” to select the replacement drive. There should be an asterisk (*) next to the replacement drive indicating that you have selected it.
  5. Enter into the “rebuild” option (ALT + R then “enter”). If done correctly, the 3ware RAID card will show the message “rebuilding” upon rebooting system. Follow this link for more detailed information about using a 3ware adapter… http://www.3ware.com/support/UserDocs/3ware9500SUsrGuide.pdf
  6. Optional: All recorders have 3ware’s 3DM 2 software installed, which will allow you to view the status of your 3ware RAID from within Windows.
    1. Double-click the “connect to 3DM 2” icon on your desktop.
    2. Log onto 3DM 2 software with the following credentials: Login: Administrator Password: DVR4321
    3. Go to Information -> Unit Information or Drive Information to check "RAID" and "drive status."




Intel:

  1. If you have a degraded state on your Intel RAID system, enter the RAID’s BIOS by using the key combination of “CTRL + I” on boot-up of system when prompted.
  2. Check to see which port number (Port 0 through Port 3) is assigned to the effected drive and replace the drive. Note: power down system before replacing drive.
  3. After replacing the drive, enter into the RAID BIOS again with “CTRL + I”. The Intel RAID should show a message indicating the status, “rebuild,” in BIOS. This message should also be displayed upon boot-up. Follow this link for more detailed info on using a Intel on-board RAID: http://download.intel.com/support/chipsets/imsm/sb/manual70.pdf
  4. Optional: If you have Intel’s Matrix Storage Manager Software installed (Downloadable atwww.intel.com ), you can view the status of your Intel RAID from within Windows and check for status.

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